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Gotthard Deutsch, Ph.D.

Professor of Jewish History, Hebrew Union College, Cincinnati, Ohio.

Contributions:
SAMOSCZ, DAVID – German author of Hebrew books for the young; born at Kempen, province of Posen, Dec. 29, 1789; died at Breslau April 29, 1864. He went at an early age to Breslau, where he was a tutor and private teacher until 1822, when he...
SAMSON BEN ABRAHAM OF SENS – French tosafist; born about 1150; died at Acre about 1230. His birthplace was probably Falaise, Calvados, where lived his grandfather, the tosafist Samson ben Joseph, called "the Elder." Samson ben Abraham was designated also...
SAMSON BEN SAMSON – French tosafist; flourished at the end of the twelfth and in the first half of the thirteenth century. Many of his explanations are found in the tosafot to the Talmud. He is mentioned also as a Biblical commentator. Samson was a...
SAMUEL (SANWEL) BEN ENOCH – Polish rabbi; flourished in the seventeenth century; born at Lublin. He officiated as dayyan at Jassy and later at Mayence. He was the author of "Dibre Shemu'el," derashot on the Pentateuch; but only that part of it on Genesis,...
SAMUEL BEN ISAAC HA-SARDI – Spanish rabbi; flourished in the first half of the thirteenth century. In his youth he attended the school of Rabbi Nathan ben Meïr of Trinquetaille, Provence, and later he returned to Spain, his native country. Conforte ("Ḳore...
SAMUEL BEN JEHIEL – Martyr of Cologne in the First Crusade, June 25, 1096. When the Crusaders hunted the Jews of Cologne out of the villages where, under the protection of Archbishop Hermann, they had sought refuge, Samuel, standing in one of the...
SAMUEL BEN JOSEPH OF VERDUN – French tosafist of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. He was a disciple of Isaac ben Samuel the Elder of Dampierre, with whom he corresponded, and is mentioned in the Tosafot, in "Or Zarua'," and in "Haggạhot Maimuniyyot" as...
SAMUEL BEN SIMEON – French scholar; lived in Provence in the fourteenth century. His Hebrew surname was "Kenesi," incorrectly derived from "keneset" (= "school"), the Hebrew translation of "d'Escola," a name frequently found in southern France. He...
SAN MARINO – Ancient republic of central Italy; situated not far from the Adriatic Sea and founded in the fourth century by the Dalmatian Marinus. The first mention of Jews here dates fromthe second half of the fourteenth century, when the...
SANHEDRIN, FRENCH – Jewish high court convened by Napoleon I. to give legal sanction to the principles expressed by the Assembly of Notables in answer to the twelve questions submitted to it by the government (see Jew. Encyc. v. 468, s.v. France)....
SAUL BEN JOSEPH OF MONTEUX – French liturgical poet; lived at Carpentras in the second half of the seventeenth century. The ritual of Avignon contains a piyyuṭ which he composed upon the deliverance of the Jews of Carpentras from the riot that broke out on...
SCALA NOVA – Important city of Anatolia opposite the island of Samos; seaport of Ephesus. The oldest epitaph in the Jewish cemetery is dated 1682; but the town evidently had Jewish inhabitants in the thirteenth century, for in 1307 a number...
SCHWERIN, GÖTZ – Hungarian rabbi and Talmudist; born in 1760 at Schwerin-on-the-Warthe (Posen); died Jan. 15, 1845; educated at the yeshibot of Presburg and Prague. In 1796 he settled in Hungary, at first living the life of a private scholar in...
SEHERR-THOSS, JOHANN CHRISTOPH, FREIHERR VON – Austrian soldier; born at Lissen Feb. 17, 1670; died Jan. 14, 1743. He is known in Jewish history as having been the first to give official recognition to the slander that the Austrian Jews treasonably aided the Prussian army in...
SELIGSOHN, SAMUEL – Hebrew poet; born at Samoczin, Posen, 1815; died there Oct. 3, 1866. He published "Ha-Abib" (Berlin, 1845), an epos. Another epos, on the destruction of Jerusalem, and various essays by him remained in manuscript.Bibliography:...
SERVIA – Kingdom of southeastern Europe; until 1876 a vassal state of Turkey. The history of the Jews of the country is almost identical with that of Belgrade and of Nish, its two oldest communities. There was no regularly organized...
SESSA, KARL BORROMÄUS ALEXANDER – Anti-Jewish author; born at Breslau Dec. 20, 1786; died there Dec. 4, 1813. He studied philosophy and medicine in various universities, graduated as doctor of medicine in Frankfort-on-the-Oder (1807), and was district physician...
SFEJ, ABRAHAM – Rabbinical author; born at Tunis in the early part of the eighteenth century; died at Amsterdam in 1784, while discharging the duties of collecting rabbi for the community of Jerusalem. Sfej left his native city and settled in...
SHABBETHAI BE'ER (FONTE) – Italian rabbi of the seventeenth century; author of "Be'er 'Eseḳ" (Venice, 1674), a collection of 112 responsa.Bibliography: Conforte, Ḳore ha-Dorot, p. 42b; Steinschneider, Cat. Bodl. col. 2231.D. S. Man.
SHABBETHAI BEN MOSES – Halakist and liturgical poet; flourished at Rome in the first half of the eleventh century. Of his halakic decisions only a few fragments are extant. After Solomon ha-Babli he was the first Hebrew poet of Rome; his poems for...
SHABBETHAI BEN MOSES HA-KOHEN – Rabbi of Semeez (Semetch), near Tikoczin, Russia, in the first half of the eighteenth century. He edited "Minḥat Kohen" (Fürth, 1741), a collection of novellæ to the Talmud by Abraham Broda, Ẓebi Ashkenazi, and Jacob Kohen...
SHALOM OF VIENNA – Austrian rabbi; lived at Wiener-Neustadt in the second half of the fourteenth century. He was distinguished for Talmudic learning, and was the first to receive the title "Morenu." Like his colleagues Meïr ha-Levi and Abraham...
SHEFAR'AM – Place in Palestine, three hours distant from Haifa, governed by a mudir. In the second century it served as a refuge for the Sanhedrin (see Usha). Nothing is known of the early history of its Jewish community, which was probably...
SHULLAM, SAMUEL – Jewish physician and historian; flourished in the second half of the sixteenth century. He was of Spanish descent, and after an adventurous life went to Constantinople, where he was supported by Kiera (Esther), who stood high in...
SID, SIDI – Common family name among Eastern Jews, borne by several rabbinical authors.Abraham Moses Sid: Servian rabbinical author; born at Nish 1842; died there 1876. He wrote many works, of which the only ones printed are the following:...