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The unedited full-text of the 1906 Jewish Encyclopedia
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Meyer Kayserling,

(deceased), Late Rabbi, Budapest, Hungary.

Contributions:
MANRESA – Town in Spain, in the province of Barcelona. In the twelfth century it is said to have contained 500 Jewish families, most of which lived in a narrow lane named "Grau dels Jueus," near the town hall; their cemetery, still called...
MARANO – Crypto-Jews of the Iberian Peninsula. The term, which is frequently derived from the New Testament phrase "maran atha" ("our Lord hath come"), denotes in Spanish "damned," "accursed," "banned"; also "hog," and in Portuguese it...
MARIK, SOLOMON – Spanish surgeon, of whose life no details are known. He wrote in Spanish in Hebrew script a work entitled "Libro de la Cirogia," of which a fragment exists in a volume of miscellanea in the royal library at Munich.David Marich...
MARTINEZ, FERRAND – Archdeacon of Ecija in the fourteenth century, and one of the most inveterate enemies of the Jewish people; lived at Seville, where among Christians he was highly respected for his piety and philanthropy. In his sermons and...
MATTATHIAS B. SIMON – Son of the Hasmonean prince Simon, whom he accompanied on his last journey, together with his brother Judah and his mother. Simon, with his sons, was invited by his son-in-law Ptolemy to a banquet in the fortress of Docus, near...
MAYER, SAMUEL – German rabbi and lawyer; born at Hechingen Jan. 3, 1807; died there Aug. 1, 1875. He studied at the Talmud Torah in his native town, entered the bet ha-midrash and the lyceum at Mannheim in 1823, and went to the University of...
MELOL, MOSES ḤAY – Compositor and translator in Leghorn (1777-93); son of Jacob Raphael Melol and brother of David Ḥayyim Melol. He translated or edited the "Sefer Azharot ha-Ḳodesh" and the Book of Ruth (Leghorn, 1777), and translated into Ladino...
MENDELSOHN, JOSEPH – German author; born at Jever Sept. 10, 1817; died at Hamburg April 4, 1856. He was admitted at an early age to the Jewish free school at Hamburg, and in 1831 entered a printing establishment at Brunswick as an apprentice,...
MENDELSON, MOSES – German Hebraist andwriter of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries; born in Hamburg; died there at an advanced age in 1861; a relative of Samson Raphael Hirsch.Mendelson lived in his native city as a private scholar. He...
MENDELSSOHN – German family rendered illustrious by the philosopher and the musician. It can not verify its ancestry further back than the father of the philosopher, though there is a family tradition that it is descended from Moses...
MENDELSSOHN – German family rendered illustrious by the philosopher and the musician. It can not verify its ancestry further back than the father of the philosopher, though there is a family tradition that it is descended from Moses...
MENDES (MENDEZ) – Netherlandish family; one of the thirty prominent Jewish families which emigrated from Spain to Portugal under the leadership of the aged rabbi Isaac Aboab, and to which King John II. assigned the city of Oporto as a residence....
MENDES, FRANCISCO – Portuguese Marano; physician to Don Affonso, brother of the cardinal infante; lived in Lisbon in the sixteenth century. The shoemaker Luis Diaz, who proclaimed himself to be the Messiah, induced Mendes to undergo circumcision at...
MENDES-NASI, FRANCISCO – Member of one of the richest and most respected Portuguese Marano families; died about 1536; husband of Beatrice de Luna. He owned a large banking-house in Lisbon, which had branches in Flanders and France, and which advanced...
MENDESIA, GRACIA – Philanthropist; born about 1510, probably in Portugal; died at Constantinople 1569; member of the Spanish family of Benveniste. As a Maranoshe was married to her coreligionist Francisco Mendes-Nasi. After the early death of her...
MEYER, SAMUEL – German rabbi; born in Hanover Feb. 26, 1819; died there July 5, 1882. He studied Talmud in his native city and at Frankfort-on-the-Main, and attended the University of Bonn. In 1845 he was chosen successor to Nathan Adler as...
MEZA (MESA) – A family of Amsterdam distinguished for the number of its members that filled rabbinic offices.Abraham Ḥayyim de Jacob de Solomon de Meza: Member of the Talmud Torah 'Eẓ Ḥayyim in Amsterdam, and author of a sermon, delivered in...
MICHEL JUD – A public character prominent in his day for wealth and influence; born about the end of the fifteenth century at Derenburg, near Halberstadt; died in 1549. He was described as of imposing appearance and eloquent of speech, and...
MINDEN, LÖB B. MOSES – Cantor and poet; born at Selichow (from which he is called also Judah b. Moses Selichower), in Lesser Poland, in the seventeenth century; died at an advanced age at Altona or Hamburg May 26, 1751. He acted as ḥazzan at...
MINIR – Family of scholars of Tudela, members of which are met with in the East and in Italy.Abraham ben Joseph Minir (probably a brother of Isaac ben Joseph Minir); Acah (Isaac) ben Ḥayyim and his son Abraham Minir; and Shem-Ṭob ben...
MONREAL – City in Navarre, situated three miles from Pamplona; to be distinguished from a city of the same name in Aragon. A small number of Jews lived here in a "Juderia." In 1320 the Jews of Pamplona, who were threatened by the...
MONTALBAN – City in Aragon; not to be confused with Montalban in Castile, in the archbishopric of Toledo, which was also inhabited by Jews. Montalban possessed a Jewish community as early as the fourteenth century. In 1306 the governor of...
MONTORO, ANTON DE – Spanish poet of the fifteenth century; born in Montoro 1404; died after March, 1477; son of Fernando Alfonso de Baena Ventura, and a near relative of the poet Juan Alfonso de Baena. His vocation was that of a "ropero"; he calls...
MONZON – Town near Lerida in the ancient kingdom of Aragon, Spain. It had a considerable Jewish community, the members of which were engaged in business, especially money-lending. In 1260 Solomon de Daroca was one of the wealthiest Jews...
MONZON, ABRAHAM (the Elder) – Rabbi of the latter part of the sixteenth century; died at Constantinople. He was a pupil of Bezaleel Ashkenazi, and on account of his knowledge and acumen was called by his contemporaries "Sinai we'Oḳer Harim" = "Polyhistor,...