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HARARITE – Epithet applied to some of David's heroes. Owing to the discrepancy which exists generally between the books of Samuel and the Chronicles, it is uncertain whether the appellation refers to two or to three men. In II Sam. xxiii....
HARBONA, HARBONAH – One of the seven eunuchs who served Ahasuerus and to whom the order was given to bring Queen Vashti before the king (Esth. i. 10). He suggested that Haman should be hanged on his own gallows (ib. vii. 9). According to R. Eleazar...
HARBURG – Jew Minters. City on the Elbe, six miles south of Hamburg, in the Prussian province of Hanover. Jews were not admitted to Harburg until the seventeenth century, when Duke William August (1603-1642) established a mint there which...
HARBURGER, HEINRICH – German jurist; born at Bayreuth, Bavaria, Oct. 2, 1851. He received his education at the gymnasium of his native town and at the University of Munich, whence he was graduated as doctor of law. After being admitted to the bar he...
HARBY – American family, resident in the southern part of the United States.Solomon Harby: First of the family in North America; son of Isaac Harby, lapidary to the emperor of Morocco. He settled at Charleston, S. C., where his son,...
HARDEN, MAXIMILIAN – German author; born at Berlin Oct. 20, 1861. Educated in the German capital, where he still resides, he became well known through his political and social articles in the "Nation," "Frankfurter Zeitung," and especially in the...
HARDT, HERMANN VON DER – German Protestant theologian and philologist; born at Melle, Westphalia, Nov. 15, 1660; died Feb. 28, 1746. He studied at Osnabrück, Jena, and Hamburg, and became professor of Oriental languages at the University of Helmstädt...
HARE – Animal mentioned in Lev. xi. 6 and Deut. xiv. 7 among the unclean animals, "because he cheweth the cud, but divideth not the hoof." The idea that the hare chews the cud probably arose from the constant moving of its jaws and...
HARFIDIL – Name of a Gothic Jew occurring in a Hebrew epitaph found near Parthenit. Chwolson places the inscription in the fifth century; and the change from the Wulfianic name "Harjafrithila" ("th" as in Eng. "this") to "Harfidil"...
ḤARIF MOSES PHINEHAS BEN ISRAEL – Polish rabbi and author; died in Lemberg 1722. He was the grandson of Moses Ḥarif the Elder and the father of Israel and Hirsch Ḥarif, the latter of whom became rabbi of Yaborow, Galicia. In 1684 he occupied the position of...
ḤARIF, ẒEBI HIRSCH – See Courland.
HARIPH – The children of Hariph, to the number of one hundred and twelve, returned from captivity with Zerubbabel (Neh. vii. 24). Hariph was one of the chiefs who sealed the covenant with Nehemiah (ib. x. 20). In the parallel list of...
ḤARITH IBN 'AMR – Yemenite king who embraced Judaism; born about 260; ascended the throne about 320; died about 330. Nothing is known of this king's history, as he is mentioned only by Abu al-Fida ("Historia Anteislamica," ed. Fleischer, p. 118),...
ḤARIZI, JUDAH B. SOLOMON – See Al-Ḥarizi, Judah b. Solomon.
HARKAVY – Russo-Jewish family. It originated, according to a tradition current in the family, with Mordecai Jaffe, author of the "Lebushim." The immediate ancestor was Joseph of Turetz (d. 1778), Turetz being a town near Nowogrudok, in...
HARKAVY, ALBERT (ABRAHAM YAKOVLEVICH) – Russian Orientalist and historian; born at Novogrudok, government of Minsk, Oct. 27, 1839. His father, Jacob Harkavy, was a wealthy merchant and a prominent Talmudic scholar, connected by descent with the Jaffe family. At the...
HARLAND, HENRY – American author; born at St. Petersburg March, 1861; educated at the College of the City of New York and at Harvard. From 1883 to 1886 he was in the office of the surrogate of New York, after which he removed to London and...
HARLOT – See Prostitution.
HARO – City in La Rioja, in the diocese of Calahorra, Spain. In the fifteenth century it contained a Jewish community, the members of which were engaged in agricultural, commercial, and industrial pursuits, particularly in tanning, and...
HAROD – Name of a well beside which Gideon and his army encamped on the morning of the day which ended in the rout of the Midianites (Judges vii. 1), and where the test of the people by their mode of drinking apparently took place (ib....
HAROSHETH (HAROSHETH OF THE GENTILES) – City supposed to have stood near Hazor, in the northern part of Canaan, afterward known as Upper Galilee, or Galilee of the Gentiles. It was so called on account of the cosmopolitan character of its inhabitants. Harosheth was...
HARP AND LYRE – The ancient Hebrews had two stringed instruments, the "kinnor" ( ) and the "nebel" ( ). In the English versions of the Old Testament the former word is wrongly translated"harp." In both instruments the strings were set in...
HARRIS, SIR AUGUSTUS GLOSSOP – English actor, playwright, and theatrical manager; born in Paris 1852; died at Folkestone, England, June 22, 1896. Harris made possible the renascence in London of grand opera, which had lapsed for want of support. Educated in...
HARRIS, DAVID – English soldier and mine-director; born in London 1852. He arrived at the Kimberley diamond fields about 1873, and in dealing in diamonds and claims met with great prosperity. While engaging in business he became an ardent...
HARRIS, MARK – English surveyor and soldier; born March 15, 1869; killed in action in Bechuanaland April 6, 1897. He was a son of Ephraim Harris, head master of the Jews' School at Manchester, where he was educated; afterward he was articled...