JewishEncyclopedia.com

The unedited full-text of the 1906 Jewish Encyclopedia
- Phrase search: "names of god"
- Exclude terms: "names of god" -zerah
- Volume/Page: v9 p419
- Diacritics optional: Ḥanukkah or hanukkah
- Search by Author: altruism author:Hirsch
search tips & recommendations
GRAZIANO, ABRAHAM JOSEPH SOLOMON BEN MORDECAI – Italian rabbi; died at Modena in 1685; cousin of Nathanael b. Benjamin Trabot. He probably belonged to the Gallico family, the name "Graziano" being the Italian equivalent of "Johanan." Graziano, who was rabbi of Modena, was the...
GREAT SYNAGOGUE – See Synagogue, Great.
GREECE – Country of southeastern Europe. The number of its Jews is not more than 9,000, distributed as follows: Corfu, 3,500; Zante, 175; Chalcis, on the island of Eubœa or Negropont, 200; Volo, 1,100; Larissa, 2,500; Trikala, 1,000;...
GREEK LANGUAGE AND THE JEWS – This article will be confined to the Greek material found in rabbinical works, since the language of the Septuagint and the New Testament requires separate discussion, and does not belong here. Latin was made accessible to the...
GREEK LAW, INFLUENCE OF THE – See Roman and Greek Law, Influence of the.
GREEN, AARON LEVY – English rabbi; born in London Aug., 1821; died March 11, 1883. A precocious student, at the age of fourteen he was successful as candidate for the post of reader in the Great Synagogue, and at seventeen was appointed minister of...
GREENBAUM, SAMUEL – American lawyer and jurist; born Jan. 23, 1854, in London; went to the United States with his parents in his infancy; educated at the New York public schools and the College of the City of New York, graduating in 1872....
GREENHUT, JOSEPH B. – American soldier; born in Germany. He enlisted as a private in the 12th Illinois Infantry at Chicago April, 1861. He served with this regiment throughout Grant's campaigns in Kentucky and Tennessee. At Fort Donelson, Greenhut...
GREETING, FORMS OF – Fixed modes of address on meeting acquaintances. With the ancient Hebrews the form of greeting depended upon the relationship of the persons. It expressed interest and sympathy, love and affection, or reverence and honor. It...
GRÉGOIRE, HENRI – Jesuit priest, politician, and advocate of the Jews; born at Vého, near Lunéville, Dec. 4, 1750; died at Paris May 28, 1831. Grégoire was a typical representative of the humanitarian ideas of the eighteenth century....
GREGORY I., THE GREAT – Pope from 590 to 604; born about 540; died 604. Descended from an old Roman senatorial family, he had held various high official positions when he suddenly retired to one of the cloisters which he had founded. Sent as ambassador...
GREGORY XIII. (UGO BUONCOMPAGNI) – Pope from 1572 to 1585; born at Bologna Feb. 7, 1502; died at Rome April 10, 1585. His attitude toward the Jews was that of a man possessed of natural goodness warped by strong feelings of intolerance and fanaticism. Soon after...
GREGORY BAR HEBRÆUS – Jacobite Syrian historian, physician, philosopher, and theologian; born at Malatia, Asiatic Turkey, 1226; died at Maragha, Persia, 1286. Gregory first studied medicine under his father, Aaron, a Jewish physician who embraced...
GRENOBLE – Capital of the department of Isère, France. It possessed a Jewish community from the end of the thirteenth century. Jacob ben Solomon, a Grenoble Jew (Zunz, "Z. G." p. 208, erroneously calls him "Isaac"), died a martyr to his...
GRIESHABER (KRIEGSHABER), ISAAC – Polish-Hungarian rabbi at Paks, Hungary; born at Cracow. He was the author of "Maḳḳel No'am" (Vienna, 1799), in which he sharply criticized Aaron Chorin for declaring the sturgeon permissible food.Bibliography: Löw, Gesammelte...
GRILICHES, ABRAHAM AVENIROVICH – Russian engraver; born at Wilna 1852; educated at the Wilna rabbinical school; graduated from the Wilna School of Designs in 1869, and from the St. Petersburg Academy of Fine Arts in 1876, when he was appointed engraver to the...
GRILICHES, AVENIR GIRSCHEVICH – Russian engraver; father of Abraham Avenirovich Griliches; born at Wilna April, 1822. Until the age of sixteen he studied the Talmud, and later, without the aid of a teacher, became an engraver. In 1871 he was employed as an...
GRODNO – Russian city; capital of the government of the same name; formerly one of the chief cities of Lithuania and, later, of Poland. It had a Jewish community about the middle of the fourteenth century, for in the "Privilege" granted...
GRONEMANN, SELIG – German rabbi; born at Flötenstein, West Prussia, Dec. 7, 1843; attended the gymnasium at Konitz and the seminary and university at Breslau; became rabbi at Strasburg (1872) and at Danzig (1878), and district rabbi of Hanover...
GROSS, CHARLES – American author; born at Troy, N. Y., Feb. 10, 1857; educated at the Troy High School; at Williams College, from which he received the degree of M.A.; and at the universities of Paris, Berlin, and Göttingen, receiving from the...
GROSS, FERDINAND – Austrian writer; born in Vienna April 8, 1849; died at Kaltenleutgeben, near Vienna, Dec. 21, 1900. His ancestors lived in Italy; his father emigrated from Padua to Hungary, and went from there to Vienna. Ferdinand began his...
GROSS, HEINRICH – German rabbi; born at Szenicz, Hungary, Nov. 6, 1835; pupil in rabbinical literature of Judah Aszod. After graduating from the Breslau seminary and from the University of Halle (Ph.D. 1866; his thesis on Leibnitz obtaining the...
GROSS, JENNY – Austrian actress; born at Szanto, Hungary. Educated for the stage by Cesarina Kupfer, she made her début in 1878 at the Carl-theater at Vienna; in 1880 she appeared at the Stadttheater, and in 1885 at the Berlin court theater,...
GROSS-KANIZSA – See Nagy-Kanizsa.
GROSSER, JULIUS – German physician; born at Freistadt, Prussian Silesia, Oct. 25, 1835; died at Prenzlau, Prussia, Oct. 25, 1901. He studied at the University of Berlin, where he graduated in 1859 as doctor of medicine. In 1861 he established a...