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The unedited full-text of the 1906 Jewish Encyclopedia
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Meyer Kayserling,

(deceased), Late Rabbi, Budapest, Hungary.

Contributions:
RAIMUCH (REMOCH), ASTRUC – Physician of Fraga in the fourteenth century. As an Orthodox Jew he visited Benveniste ibn Labi of Saragossa and other prominent Jews; but in 1391 he renounced his religion, taking the name of Francisco Dias-Corni, and...
REICH, MORITZ – German writer; born at Rokitnitz, Bohemia, April 20, 1831; died there March 26, 1857. The son of an indigent shoḥeṭ and ḥazzan, he attended the gymnasia at Reichenau and at Prague, and went in 1853 to Vienna, where he devoted...
RIBEIRO, JOÃO PINTO – Portuguese scholar; curator of the royal archives in Torre do Tombe, at Lisbon; died in that city Aug. 11, 1649. He was the author of a work defending the Maranos, entitled "Discurso si es Util, y Justo, Desterrar de los Reinos...
RIMOS (REMOS), MOSES – Physician, poet, and martyr; born at Palma, Majorca, about 1406; died at Palermo 1430. He was a relative of the Moses Rimos who was known by the name "El Pergaminero" = "the parchment manufacturer," and who, in 1391, was...
ROCAMORA, ISAAC (VICENTE) DE – Spanish monk, physician, and poet; born about 1600 of Marano parents at Valencia; died April 8, 1684, at Amsterdam. Educated for the Church, he became a Dominican monk (assuming the name "Vicente de Rocamora") and confessor to...
RODRIGUEZ – In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries many persons bearing the surname Rodriguezwere condemned by the Inquisition to death at the stake or to lifelong imprisonment on the ground that they were "Judaizantes" or secret...
ROMAN, JACOB BEN ISAAC IBN BAKODA – Bibliographer and writer, of Spanish descent; born at Constantinople about 1570; died at Jerusalem in 1650. He was possessed of great knowledge; according to Conforte he knew the whole of the Mishnah by heart, and he was well...
ROSALES, JACOB HEBRÆUS (IMMANUEL BOCARRO FRANCES Y ROSALES) – Physician, mathematician, astrologer, and poet; born in 1588 or, according to some, in 1593, at Lisbon; died either at Florence or at Leghorn in 1662 or 1668; son of the Marano physician Fernando Bocarro. On completing his...
ROTHSCHILD, DAVID – German rabbi and author; born at Hamm, Westphalia, Nov. 16, 1816; died at Aachen Jan. 28, 1892. After completing his studies he became preacher in his native town. In 1850 he was called as rabbi to Aachen, and in 1862 to Alzey,...
SAADIA (SA'ID) B. DAVID AL-ADENI – A man of culture living at Damascus and Safed between 1473 and 1485. He was the author of a commentary on some parts of Maimonides' Yad ha-Ḥazaḳah, and copied the commentary of an Arabian writer on the first philosophical...
SAHAGUN (SANT FAGUND) – City in the old Spanish kingdom of Leon. On March 5, 1152, King Alfonso VII. granted to the thirty Jewish families living there the same privileges which the Jews in the city of Leon had received from Alfonso VI. (Becerro, "Ms....
SALAMANCA – Spanish city; capital of the province of the same name; famous for its university. The Jews of Salamanca rendered valuable services to King Ferdinand II. of Leon during the war against the King of Castile in 1169, and in return...
SAMUEL – Tax-gatherer and treasurer to King Ferdinand IV. of Castile (1295-1312); born in Andalusia. He was hated by the queen mother D. Maria de Molina because, according to Spanish historians who were friendly toward her, he had become...
SAN MILLÁN DE LA COGOLLA – Locality in Spain, not far from Najera, with a famous convent of great antiquity. Jews were living here as early as at Najera, and they suffered greatly in the civil war between D. Pedro and D. Henry de Trastamara. On Oct. 15,...
SANTANGEL (SANCTO ANGELOS), LUIS (AZARIAS) DE – 1. Marano and learned jurist of Calatayud, Spain; died before 1459. He was converted by the sermons of Vicente Ferrer, and was made magistrate ("zalmedina") of the capital of Aragon. The name Luis de Santangel was borne also by...
SANTAREM – City of Portugal. Even before its conquest by the Portuguese in 1140, it possessed a Jewry, situated near the Church of S. Ildefonso. It is now more than two centuries since this ceased to exist. The synagogue of Santarem was...
SANTOB (SHEM-ṬOB) DE CARRION – Spanish poet; born toward the end of the thirteenth century at Carrion de los Condes, a town in Castile, whence his cognomen. He lived in the reigns of Alfonso XI. and his son and successor Pedro, with both of whom he was in...
SARAGOSSA – Under the Spaniards. Capital of the former kingdom of Aragon. The city is situated on the Ebro, which is crossed by a long stone bridge constructed with the municipal fees received from the miḳweh during the two years beginning...
SASPORTAS – Spanish family of rabbis and scholars, the earliest known members of which lived at Oran, Algeria, at the end of the sixteenth century. The name seems to indicate that the family originally came from a place called Seisportas (=...
SCHWARZ, ADOLF – Austrian theologian; born July, 1846, at Adász-Tevel, near Papa, Hungary. He received his early instruction in the Talmud from his father, who was a rabbi. He then went to the gymnasium in Papa, and subsequently entered the...
SEGOVIA – In the Fourteenth Century. City of Spain in Old Castile; situated between Burgos, Toledo, and Avila. When conquered by Alfonso VI. it already had a considerable Jewish community, which in 1294 paid 10,806 maravedis in taxes. In...
SENIOR, ABRAHAM – Court rabbi of Castile, and royal tax-farmer-in-chief; born in Segovia in the early part of the fifteenth century; a near relative of the influential Andreas de Cabrera. On account of his wealth, intelligence, and aristocratic...
SEPHARDIM – Descendants of the Jews who were expelled from Spain and Portugal and who settled in southern France, Italy, North Africa, Turkey, Asia Minor, Holland, England, North and South America, Germany, Denmark, Austria, and Hungary....
SEPULVEDA – City in the bishopric of Segovia, Spain, inhabited by Jews as early as the eleventh century. Its old laws contained a paragraph (No. 71) to the effect that if a Jew had intercourse with a Christian woman, he should be condemned...
SEVILLE – Early History. Capital of the former kingdom of Seville; after Madrid the greatest and most beautiful city of Spain. The community of Seville is one of the oldest and largest in the country. Jews are said to have settled there,...