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The unedited full-text of the 1906 Jewish Encyclopedia
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Cyrus Adler, Ph.D.

President of the American Jewish Historical Society; Former President of the Board of Directors of the Jewish Theological Seminary of America; Assistant Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D. C.

Contributions:
JUDD, MAX – American manufacturer, consul-general, and chess-player; born Dec. 27, 1851, at Cracow, Austria; emigrated to the United States when eleven years old. From 1864 to 1867 he lived in Washington, D. C., and, on becoming an American...
ḲADDISH – Name of the doxology recited, with congregational responses, at the close of the prayers in the synagogue; originally, and now frequently, recited after Scripture readings and religious discourses in schoolhouse or synagogue. It...
ḲADDISH – Name of the doxology recited, with congregational responses, at the close of the prayers in the synagogue; originally, and now frequently, recited after Scripture readings and religious discourses in schoolhouse or synagogue. It...
ḲADDISH – Name of the doxology recited, with congregational responses, at the close of the prayers in the synagogue; originally, and now frequently, recited after Scripture readings and religious discourses in schoolhouse or synagogue. It...
KAISER, ALOIS – azzan and composer; born Nov. 10, 1840, at Szobotist, Hungary. He received his early education in the religious school of the Vienna congregation under Dr. Henry Zirndorf, and then studied at the Realschule and the Teachers'...
KALISCH, ISIDOR – American rabbi and author; born Nov. 15, 1816, at Krotoschin; died May 11, 1886, at Newark, N. J.; studied theology, philosophy, and philology at the universities of Berlin, Breslau, and Prague. In consequence of giving public...
KANSAS – One of the northern central states of the United States; admitted to the Union in 1861. In 1830 immigrants settled in a spot which they named "Kansas City." It is supposed that Jews also settled there at an early date; and they...
ḲEDUSHSHAH – The third benediction of the 'Amidah is called "Holiness of the Name" (R. H. iv. 4), to distinguish it from "Holiness of the Day," the benediction which refers to the Sabbath or a festival; but "Ḳedushshah" in popular speech...
KELTER, ARTHUR – American athlete; born in New York city March 3, 1869; went to San Francisco, Cal., when nine years old. Kelter became a gymnast and also took up roller-skating as a profession. He holds the record for jumping on skates, which...
KENTUCKY – One of the south central states of the United States; admitted in 1792. Its most important Jewish community is at Louisville (population, in 1900, 204,731, of which about 7,000 are Jews). Two brothers named Heymann, or Hyman,...
KENTUCKY – One of the south central states of the United States; admitted in 1792. Its most important Jewish community is at Louisville (population, in 1900, 204,731, of which about 7,000 are Jews). Two brothers named Heymann, or Hyman,...
ḲEROBOT – A term applied to the scheme of Piyyuṭim in the earlier part of the repetition of the morning 'Amidah on special Sabbaths, on the Three Festivals, and on New-Year, in the Ashkenazic liturgy. The Neo-Hebraic verses in the...
KETUBAH – Legal: A marriage contract, containing among other things the settlement on the wife of a certain amount payable at her husband's death or on her being divorced. This institution was established by the Rabbis in order to put a...
KETUBAH – Legal: A marriage contract, containing among other things the settlement on the wife of a certain amount payable at her husband's death or on her being divorced. This institution was established by the Rabbis in order to put a...
KEYSER, EPHRAIM – American sculptor; born at Baltimore, Md., Oct. 6, 1850; educated at the City College of Baltimore and at the art academies of Munich (where he won a silver medal for a bronze statue of a page) and Berlin. In 1880 he settled in...
ḲIDDUSH – Ceremony and prayer by which the holiness of the Sabbath or of a festival is proclaimed. For the Sabbath the Scripture imposes this duty in the words: "Remember the Sabbath day to keep it holy," which, according to Shab. 86a,...
KI LO NA'EH – A hymn, beginning thus, in the home-ritual for Passover eve, and one of the latest constituents of the Seder Haggadah, dating from the fifteenth century (see Haggadah). It was originally intended for the first night of the...
KIRALFY, IMRE – Musical composer; born in Budapest, Hungary, Jan. 1, 1845. He received his musical education at Budapest, Vienna, and Paris. Kiralfy, who commenced composition of music at the age of twelve, is the author, originator, and...
KISS AND KISSING – Biblical Instances. The custom of kissing is not found among savage races, among whom other forms of greeting, such as rubbing of noses, take its place. Among Orientals, who keep the sexes strictly separated, kissing on the...
KLEEBERG, MINNA COHEN – German-American poetess; born in Elmshorn, Holstein, Germany, July 21, 1841; died in New Haven, Conn., Dec. 31, 1878. Her father, Marcus Cohen, a physician, gave her a careful education. Her poetic endowment showed itself early....
KLEIN, CHARLES – English dramatist; born at London Jan. 7, 1867; educated at the North London Collegiate School. Klein is the author of "A Mile a Minute" (produced by Minnie Palmer); "The District Attorney"; the libretto of "El Capitan"...
KLEIN, PHILIP – American rabbi; born May 22, 1848, at Baracska, Hungary. He was educated in the Talmudical schools of his native country and continued his studies in the gymnasium of Presburg and in the universities of Vienna, Berlin (Ph.D.),...
KNEFLER, FREDERICK – American soldier; born in Hungary in 1833. He went to America, and when the Civil war broke out he enlisted as a private in the 79th Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry. He became successively captain, major, colonel, and...
KNOT – Some form of quipu or knot-alphabet appears to have been adopted in Biblical, or, at least, in Talmudical times, to judge from the form taken by the ẓiẓit. Whether any mystical influence was connected therewith is uncertain, but...
KOHLER, KAUFMANN – Rabbi and theologian; born in Fürth, Bavaria, May 10, 1843; a descendant of a family of rabbis. He received his rabbinical training at Hassfurt, Höchberg near Würzburg, Mayence, Altona, and at Frankfort-on-the-Main (under Samson...