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Richard Gottheil, Ph.D.

Professor of Semitic Languages, Columbia University, New York; Chief of the Oriental Department, New York Public Library; New York City.

Contributions:
ḤAYYIM – A common prænomen among the Jews, especially during the Middle Ages. In its Latin form it occurs on the Hebrew mosaic of Kafr Kenna as , i.e. "Vita" ("Pal. Explor. Fund Statement," 1901, p. 377), and in the Jewish catacombs of...
ḤAYYIM, ABRAHAM BEN JUDAH IBN – Spanish scholar and scribe of the thirteenth century. He wrote a Spanish treatise on the preparation of gold-foil and colors for miniatures; also a treatise, probably in Hebrew, on the Masorah and on the crowned letters in the...
ḤAYYIM BEN ISRAEL – Spanish philosopher and author; lived in Toledo about 1272-77; a descendant of the Israeli family and a relative of Isaac Israeli, author of the astronomical work "Yesod 'Olam." He wrote a treatise on paradise, which exists in...
ḤAYYIM HA-LEVI – Physician, and chief rabbi of the united congregations in the archbishopric of Toledo. As the chief rabbi, Zulaimah Alfahan, did not personally administer his office, but resided permanently at Seville, Archbishop D. Pedro...
ḤAYYIM BEN NATHAN – German scholar of the seventeenth century. He translated into Judæo-German the historical portions of the Bible. In the preface to his translation he says that he derived his version from the "Galchisch" Bible (Bible of the...
HA-ẒEBI – Hebrew weekly, published at Jerusalem, beginning in 1876, by Eliezer Benjudah. At the end of 1899 he began to publish a supplement, also in Hebrew, dealing with agriculture, under the title "Ha-'Iḳḳar." The supplement, however,...
SEVILLE – Early History. Capital of the former kingdom of Seville; after Madrid the greatest and most beautiful city of Spain. The community of Seville is one of the oldest and largest in the country. Jews are said to have settled there,...
HA-ẒEFIRAH – Hebrew newspaper; founded by Ḥayyim Selig Slonimski at Warsaw Jan. 25, 1862. In 1863 it was suspended on account of the Polish troubles. Slonimski revived it in 1874, the first two volumes appearing at Berlin, the third and...
ḤAZZAN, ABRAHAM BEN JUDAH – Cantor at Kremenetz, Volhynia, in the sixteenth century. In 1595, after recovering from a terrible malady which ended in a trance, he applied himself to utilizing certain material for a haggadic commentary upon the Prophets and...
HEBREW, THE – Jewish weekly; established in San Francisco, Cal., in 1863, by Philo Jacoby, a son of Isaac Jacoby, rabbi of Lauenburg, Pomerania. It is still published by its founder, and is the oldest Jewish paper on the Pacific coast. Rabbis...
HEBREW LEADER, THE – Weekly newspaper; published in New York city by Jonas Bondy, who edited it. The first number was issued in May, 1850, and the last on Dec. 8, 1882. Its theological position was conservative. A distinct feature of the paper was...
HEBREW OBSERVER, THE – Periodical; published in London by Abraham Benisch. The first and only number appeared Jan. 7, 1853.G. A. M. F.
HEBREW REVIEW, THE – Literary magazine; published at Cincinnati, Ohio, during the years 1881 and 1892 (2 vols.) by the Rabbinical Literary Association of America. The president of the association, Dr. Max Lilienthal, and after his decease the...
HEBREW REVIEW AND MAGAZINE OF RABBINICAL LITERATURE, THE – Journal; published in London by Morris Jacob Raphail from Oct. 3, 1834, to and including Sept., 1835 (2 vols.). The object of the magazine was to foster the study of rabbinical literature.G. A. M. F.
HEBREW STANDARD, THE – Weekly; founded in New York city by J. P. Solomon on Sept. 23, 1881. Solomon has been its sole editor and proprietor. The paper is strongly conservative and of Orthodox tendencies, and has always taken a definite political...
HEBREW UNION COLLEGE JOURNAL – Monthly magazine, edited and published by students of Hebrew Union College, Cincinnati, Ohio, in the interests of that institution. The first number appeared in October, 1896. It publishes articles on Jewish literary subjects,...
SEXTUS, JULIUS AFRICANUS – His Knowledge of Languages. Byzantine chronographer, noted for his surprisingly lucid interpretations of some Biblical questions; flourished in the first half of the third century of the common era. Suidas (s.v. Ἀφρικανός) says...
HEGESIPPUS – 1. One of the earliest writers of the Christian Church; lived at Rome, whither he had gone about 150 from Palestine or Syria, by way of Corinth; died about 189. According to Eusebius, he was by birth a Jew; and though this is...
HEILBRONN (HEILPRIN), ABRAHAM BEN MOSES ASHKENAZI – Chief rabbi of Lemberg; born in 1578; died Jan. 2, 1649. His father was related to R. Solomon Edels. Abraham Heilbronn wrote: "Birkat Abraham," a homily which he delivered on the day of his "bar miẓwah" (Prague); "Ahabat...
HELENA – Queen of Adiabene, wife of Monobaz I., and mother of Monobaz II.; died about 56 C.E. Her name and the fact that she was her husband's sister (Josephus, "Ant." xx. 2, § 1) show that she was of Greek origin. She became a convert...
HELLENISM – Word used to express the assimilation, especially by the Jews, of Greek speech, manners, and culture, from the fourth century B.C. through the first centuries of the common era. Post-exilic Judaism was largely recruited from...
HELLER, YOM-ṬOB LIPMANN BEN NATHAN BEN MOSES LEVI – Rabbi and liturgical poet; born at Wallerstein, Bavaria, 1579; died at Cracow Sept. 7, 1654. Erroneously the editor of the "Megillat Ebah" concludes from his epitaph that Heller died April 23; Hock ("Gal 'Ed," p. 65) gives Aug....
HENRIQUEZ (ENRIQUEZ), ISABELLA – Spanish poetess; lived at Madrid; died after 1680. She distinguished herself in the different academies at Madrid. Isaac (Fernando) Cardoso dedicated to her his work, "Del Color Verde," on the color green, which is the symbol of...
HENRY II – King of Castile; born at Seville in 1333; died in 1379; illegitimate brother of Pedro I. He was as hostile to the Jews as Pedro had been friendly. His long-cherished hatred of his brother burst forth when a Jew named Jacob, an...
HEZEKIAH ROMAN BEN ISAAC IBN PAḲUDA – Turkish scholar; flourished at Constantinople in 1600. He was the author of "Zikron ha-Sefarim," a catalogue of all the grammatical works written from the time of Judah Ḥayyuj to the time of the author, reproduced by Wolf in...