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Joseph Jacobs, B.A.

Formerly President of the Jewish Historical Society of England; Corresponding Member of the Royal Academy of History, Madrid; New York City.

Contributions:
JOCEUS (JOCE) OF YORK – English Jew of the preexpulsion period; leader of the York community at the time of the massacre in 1190. He is mentioned in the first English sheṭar, of 1176 (Jacobs, "Jews of Angevin England," p. 58). He was one of those who...
JOHANAN BEN ISAAC OF HOLLESCHAU – Rabbi of the German community of London at the beginning of the eighteenth century. He edited "Teshubot ha-Geonim," responsa of contemporary rabbis on the pronunciation of the divine names, with additions of his own (Amsterdam,...
JOEL, LEWIS – British consul-general to Chile; born in Dublin 1824; died in London Feb. 28, 1899. He was educated at Bristol; in May, 1861, was appointed unpaid British vice-consul at Cobija; and from Sept., 1863, to June, 1866, was acting...
JOHANNES PAULI – German humorist and convert to Christianity; born about 1455; died at Thann 1530. He became a distinguished preacher of the Franciscan Order at Oppenheim and Strasburg, at which latter place he took notes of Geiler's sermons,...
JOHANNESBURG – Largest city in the Transvaal and principal center of Jewish life in South Africa. The Jewish community there is estimated at 12,000 in a total population of 120,000—the largest relative number, outside of Aden and Gibraltar, in...
JOHN OF CAPUA – Italian convert to Christianity, and translator; flourished between 1262 and 1269. He translated Rabbi Joel's Hebrew version of "Kalilah wa-Dimnah" into Latin under the title "Directorium Vite Humane"; and his translation was...
JONATHAN BEN HORḲINAS (ARCHINAS) – Palestinian scholar of the first century; contemporary of Eleazar b. Azariah and a disciple of the school of Shammai. He was reputed for his acuteness, in recognition of which he was styled "bekor saṭan" (= "first-born as...
JOSEPH IBN ḤASAN – Arabic author of the fifteenth century or earlier. In 1467 he wrote "Muḥsin al-Adab," on culture, in fifty ḳaṣidahs. It was adapted from the "Sefer ha-Musar" of Isaac ibn Crispin, according to Steinschneider (Neubauer, "Cat....
YEMEN – Province comprising the southwestern part of Arabia. Various traditions trace the earliest settlement of Jews in this region back to the time of Solomon, and the Sanaite Jews have a legend to the effect that their forefathers...
JONES, THOMAS – English publisher; convert to Judaism; born in 1791; died in London May 25, 1882. By birth a Roman Catholic, his change of faith was the result of deep study and conviction. Jones, who for many years pursued the business of...
KALILAH WA-DIMNAH – Book of Indian fables which has been translated into most of the languages of the Old World. It appears to have been composed in India, about 300 C.E., as a Brahmin rival to the Buddhist fable-books, and includes variants of...
JOSEPH – Sold as Slave. —Biblical Data: Eleventh son of Jacob and the elder of the two sons of Rachel; born at Haran (Gen. xxx. 24). The meaning given to the name (l.c.) is "shall add": "The Lord shall add to me another son." It seems...
JOSEPH, HENRY SAMUEL – English convert to Christianity; born in 1801; died at Strasburg, Alsace, Jan. 28, 1864. At first a preacher in the synagogue at Bedford, he became converted to Christianity and was ordained in 1839 as a literate in the Church...
JOSEPH (B. JACOB) OF MANDEVILLE (MORELL) – French exegete; pupil of Abraham ibn Ezra. He wrote a supercommentary on that scholar's commentary on Exodus (Neubauer, "Cat. Bodl. Hebr. MSS." No. 1234, 9). It is probable that he is identical with the Joseph b. Jacob to whom...
JOSEPH, MORRIS – English rabbi; born in London May 28, 1848; educated at Jews' College in that city. He was appointed rabbi of the North London Synagogue in 1868, and in 1874 went to the Old Hebrew Congregation of Liverpool, where he officiated...
JOSEPH, SAMUEL A. – Australian pioneer and politician; born in London 1824; died in Sydney, New South Wales, Sept. 25, 1898. At the age of eighteen he emigrated to New Zealand, and there acquired so thorough a knowledge of the native language that...
JOSEPH ZABARA (Joseph ben Meïr Zabara) – Spanish physician, satirist, and poet of the beginning of the thirteenth century; born and died in Barcelona. He studied in Narbonne under Joseph Ḳimḥi, who twice quotes Zabara on Proverbs. The only work known to be his is the...
JOSEPHS, MICHAEL – English Hebraist and communal worker; born in Königsberg Oct. 8, 1763; died in London Feb. 9, 1849. He left his native town in his thirteenth year for Berlin, where he attended the Talmudical colleges and met Moses Mendelssohn....
JOSEPHS, WALTER – English educationist and communal worker; born in London Nov. 22, 1804; died Jan. 24, 1893. He was closely connected with the management of the following institutions: Jews' Free School; Jews' Infant School (honorary secretary...
JUDAH B. EZEKIEL – Transmits Rab's and Samuel's Sayings. Babylonian amora of the second generation; born in 220; died at Pumbedita in 299. He was the most prominent disciple of Rab (Abba Arika), in whose house he often stayed, and whose son Ḥiyya...
JUDAH B. ḤIYYA – Palestinian amora of the first generation (3d cent.); son of the famous R. Ḥiyya. In Midr. Shemuel xi., and in Yer. Sanh. 29b, he is called also Judah be-Rabbi. He was the twin brother of Hezekiah (Yeb. 65b) and son-in-law of...
JUDAH BEN ISAAC – French tosafist; born in Paris 1166; died there 1224 (Solomon Luria, Responsa, No. 29). According to Gross he was probably a descendant of Rashi, and a pupil of Isaac b. Samuel of Dampierre and his son Elhanan. He married a...
JUDAH IBN ḲURAISH – Hebrew grammarian and lexicographer; born at Tahort, northern Africa; flourished in the eighth and ninth centuries. In his grammatical work he advanced little beyond his predecessors, but his contributions to comparative...
JUDITH MONTEFIORE COLLEGE – Theological seminary founded in 1869 by Sir Moses Montefiore in honor of his wife, Lady Judith Montefiore, at Ramsgate. Kent, England, near his residence, East Cliff Lodge. It mainly took the form of a bet ha-midrash attended by...
JÜLICH – City of Rhenish Prussia, near Aix-la-Chapelle, situated on the Ruhr. In 1227 Emperor Frederick II. conferred upon Count Wilhelm of Jülich the right to dispose, without any interference on the part of the crown, of any Jews who...