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Joseph Jacobs, B.A.

Formerly President of the Jewish Historical Society of England; Corresponding Member of the Royal Academy of History, Madrid; New York City.

Contributions:
JUNIOR RIGHT – System of tenure in which a father's property descends to the youngest son; ultimogeniture as opposed to primogeniture. It has been suggested that the custom arose during the pastoral or nomad period, when the eldest son would...
JUS PRIMÆ NOCTIS – Alleged seigniorial right to marital privileges. The feudal lords had the right of giving heiresses in marriage, and there appear to be traces of still more intimate rights over the daughters of tenants, though this has been...
ḲABIṢI, ABRAHAM AL- – Printer in Constantinople in the sixteenth century. Together with Judah Sason and Moses ben Joseph Hamon he published "Toledot Adam we-Ḥawwah" by Jeroham ben Meshullam (Constantinople, 1516).Bibliography: Steinschneider,...
KALISCH, MARCUS M. – Hebraist and Bible commentator; born at Treptow, Pomerania, May 16, 1828; died in Derbyshire, England, Aug. 24, 1885. He was educated at Berlin University, where he studied classics, philology, and the Semitic languages, and at...
SIMEON – Biblical Data: Second son of Jacob by Leah, and progenitor of one of the tribes of Israel; born at Padan-aram. In Gen. xxix. 33 the origin of the name is given: "God hath heard that I am hated" (R. V.). Various etymological...
KENNICOTT, BENJAMIN – English Christian Hebraist; born at Totness, England, April 4, 1718; died at Oxford Aug. 18, 1783. He was, at first, master of the "Blue Coat," or charity, school at Totness. Attracting the attention of the local gentry by some...
KARFUNKELSTEIN, SIEGFRIED – German soldier; born at Beuthen, Silesia, Feb. 21,1848; died on the field of battle at Le Bourget Oct. 30, 1870. He volunteered in 1866 and went through the Six Weeks' war. In the Franco-Prussian war he distinguished himself so...
KARLSRUHE (CARLSRUHE) – German city; capital of the grand duchy of Baden. Jews began to settle there soon after its foundation (1715) by Margrave Carl Wilhelm of Baden-Durlach; they were attracted by the numerous privileges granted by its founder to...
KATZENELLENBOGEN – An old, widely ramified family counting many rabbis among its members, who were and are still found in Italy, Poland, Germany, Alsace, and also in America. It derived its name from the locality of Katzenelnbogen in the Prussian...
KHURILKAR, JOSEPH DANIEL – BeniIsrael soldier; bahadur subahdar in the Anglo-Indian army. He enlisted in the Sixteenth Regiment Bengal Native Infantry, and was successively promoted to the ranks of jemidar (July 14, 1856), subahdar (Jan. 1, 1858), and...
KEAN, EDMUND – English actor; born in London Nov. 4 (?), 1787; died at Richmond, near London, May 15, 1833. He was the natural son of Aaron Kean, a Jew (Stirling, "Old Drury Lane," ii. 131). Contemporary writers have alluded frequently to...
ḲEDESHAH – The ḳedeshot were sacred prostitutes attached to the Temple as priestesses of Ashtoreth or Astarte. The worship of Ashtoreth was introduced by Solomon (I Kings xi. 5); and it is possible that the obscene rites connected...
KEFAR-SALAMA (CAPHAR-SALAMA) – Scene of Nicanor's unsuccessful attack upon Judas Maccabeus (I Macc. vii. 31; comp. Josephus, "Ant." xii. 10, § 4). The exact site is somewhat doubtful. There are several names of places in modern Palestine between Jaffa and...
KELIM – Treatise in the Mishnah and in the Tosefta, dealing chiefly with a more precise definition of the rules in Lev. xi. 32 et seq., Num. xix. 14 et seq., and xxxi. 20 et seq. The name "Kelim" is found in the Mishnah itself (Kelim...
KHURILKAR, SAMUEL EZEKIEL – Beni-Israel soldier; subahdar in the Anglo-Indian army. He enlisted in the Sixteenth Native Infantry of Bengal in 1790, and was made subahdar May 21, 1802. He was decorated with a bronze medal dated May 4, 1799, on one side of...
ḲIMḤI – Name of a family of scholars, the earliest known members of which lived at the end of the eleventh and in the twelfth century. The name was so common that it was used by R. Michael in his "Seder ha-Geṭ" as a paradigm word. It is...
KISS AND KISSING – Biblical Instances. The custom of kissing is not found among savage races, among whom other forms of greeting, such as rubbing of noses, take its place. Among Orientals, who keep the sexes strictly separated, kissing on the...
KING – Chief ruler of a nation.—Biblical Data: In Jewish history the first ruler called "king" was Saul, son of Kish, but in Palestine almost every chieftain bore this title. According to Josh. xi. 1-2, the country contained numbers of...
KING – Chief ruler of a nation.—Biblical Data: In Jewish history the first ruler called "king" was Saul, son of Kish, but in Palestine almost every chieftain bore this title. According to Josh. xi. 1-2, the country contained numbers of...
MAGIC – The pretended art of producing preternatural effects; one of the two principal divisions of occultism, the other being Divination. The effects produced may be either physical (as a storm or death under conditions insufficient to...
ḲINNIM – Name of a treatise of the Mishnah in the series Ḳodashim. The Pentateuchal law ordains the sacrifice of two turtle-doves or of two young pigeons for a person that has been cured of an issue (Lev. xv. 14-15, 28-29). A similar...
KISCH – Family of some distinction; migrated in the 16th century from Chiesch in Bohemia; the founder of the family lived in Prague in the eighteenth century, and the members are now spread throughout Europe. The most prominent members...
KLEIN, HERMANN – English musical critic; born at Norwich July 23, 1856. He studied singing under Manuel Garcia from 1874 to 1877, and in 1888 was appointed professor of singing at the Guildhall School of Music, London. Having begun his career as...
KNOT – Some form of quipu or knot-alphabet appears to have been adopted in Biblical, or, at least, in Talmudical times, to judge from the form taken by the ẓiẓit. Whether any mystical influence was connected therewith is uncertain, but...
KOL NIDRE – Prayer recited in the synagogue at the beginning of the evening service on the Day of Atonement; the name is taken from the opening words. The "Kol Nidre" has had a very eventful history, both in itself and in its influence on...