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Joseph Jacobs, B.A.

Formerly President of the Jewish Historical Society of England; Corresponding Member of the Royal Academy of History, Madrid; New York City.

Contributions:
MACHIM, MASAHOD COHEN – Moorish envoy to England, in 1813, from Mulai Sulaiman, Emperor of Morocco (1794-1822), in whose reign Christian slavery was abolished in Morocco. His son Meïr Cohen Machim visited England in the same capacity in...
MACHIR – 1. The first-born son of Manasseh (Josh. xvii. 1; I Chron. vii. 14); founder of the most important or dominant branch of the tribe of Manasseh. His importance is shown by the collocation of Ephraim and Machir (instead of...
MAGAZIN FÜR DIE WISSENSCHAFT DES JUDENTHUMS – Journal founded by Dr. Abraham Berliner Jan. 1, 1874. It appeared first as a bimonthly, in quarto form, under the title "Magazin für Jüdische Geschichte und Literatur," and contained a series of articles by Berliner on Hebrew...
MAGEN DAWID – The hexagram formed by the combination of two equilateral triangles; used as the symbol of Judaism. It is placed upon synagogues, sacred vessels, and the like, and was adopted as a device by the American Jewish Publication...
MAGGID – Itinerant preacher, skilled as a narrator of stories. A preacher of the more scholarly sort was called "darshan" and usually occupied the official position of rabbi. The title of "maggid mesharim" (= "a preacher of uprightness";...
MAGNUS, LADY KATIE – English authoress and communal worker; born at Portsmouth May 2, 1844; daughter of E. Emanuel; wife of Sir Philip Magnus. She has been connected with various committees of the Berkeley Street Synagogue, has taken a great...
MAGNUS, LAURIE – English author and publisher; son of Sir Philip Magnus; born in London in 1872; educated at Magdalen College, Oxford. He was the Berlin correspondent of the London "Morning Post" (1897-98) and leader-writer for thesame paper. He...
MAGNUS, SIR PHILIP – English educationist; born in London Oct. 7, 1842; educated at University College in that city, and at the University of London (B.A. 1863; B.Sc. 1864). Destined for the Jewish ministry, he pursued his studies in Berlin...
MAḤZOR – Term applied to the compilation of prayers and piyyuṭim; originally it designated the astronomical or yearly cycle. By the Sephardim it was used for a collection which contains the prayers for the whole year, while the...
MAI, JOSEPH BEN MICHAEL – German printer; born at Dyhernfurth Dec. 29, 1764; died at Breslau Dec. 1, 1810. His father had a printing establishment at Dyhernfurth, to which Joseph and his brother succeeded. Mai was a Talmudic scholar and wrote prefaces to...
MAIMON (MAIMUN) BEN JOSEPH – Spanish exegete and moralist; born about 1110; father of Moses Maimonides. He studied under Joseph ibn Migash at Lucena, and became a dayyan. He was the author of a commentary, in Arabic, on the Pentateuch, fragments of which...
MALEKAR, MOSES BAPUJEE – Beni-Israel soldier; born at Bombay about 1830. He enlisted in the 12th Regiment Native Infantry April 12, 1851; was made subahdar Jan. 1, 1865; subahdar-major Feb. 15, 1878. He received the second class Order of British India...
MAMON (MAMMON) – Mishnaic Hebrew and Aramaic for "riches." The word itself is given in the Sermon on the Mount. "Ye can not serve God and mammon" (Matt. vi. 24). There is no evidence that there was a Syriac god of this name, the modern idea that...
MANASSEH – 1. The elder of two sons born before the famine to Joseph and Osnath, daughter of the priest of Heliopolis (Gen. xli. 50-51, xlvi. 20). Biblical etymology, deriving his name from (= "to forget"), makes it signify "He who causes...
MANASSEH – 1. The elder of two sons born before the famine to Joseph and Osnath, daughter of the priest of Heliopolis (Gen. xli. 50-51, xlvi. 20). Biblical etymology, deriving his name from (= "to forget"), makes it signify "He who causes...
MANASSEH – 1. The elder of two sons born before the famine to Joseph and Osnath, daughter of the priest of Heliopolis (Gen. xli. 50-51, xlvi. 20). Biblical etymology, deriving his name from (= "to forget"), makes it signify "He who causes...
MANASSEH BEN ISRAEL – Dutch polyhistor; born at La Rochelle about 1604 (see Bethen-court in "Jew. Chron." May 20, 1904); died at Middleburg, Netherlands, Nov. 26, 1657. After the auto da fé of Aug. 3, 1603, his parents had thought it prudent to leave...
MANCHESTER – City in Lancashire, England, and one of the chief British manufacturing centers. It has a population of 543,969, of whom about 25,000 are Jews (the second largest Jewish community in the British empire). The history of the...
MANDÆANS – Language. Eastern religious sect that professes and practises an admixture of Christian, Jewish, and heathen doctrines and customs. The members of the sect live in Lower Babylonia, in the territory of Wasiṭ and Bassora, near...
MANESSIER DE VESOUL – French communal leader; originally from Vesoul and probably of the family of Héliot of Vesoul, whose ledger has been published by Isidore Loeb (in "R. E. J." viii., ix.). He is chiefly known in connection with the Paris...
MANETTI, GIANNOZZO – Italian statesman and Christian Hebraist; born in Florence 1396; died at Naples Oct. 26, 1459. At the suggestion of Pope Nicholas V., who had made him one of his secretaries, Manetti learned Hebrew from a Jew named Manuel. He is...
MANNHEIMER, ISAAC NOAH – Jewish preacher; born at Copenhagen Oct. 17, 1793; died at Vienna March 17, 1865. The son of a ḥazzan, he began the study of the Talmud at an early age, though not to the neglect of secular studies. On completing the course of...
MARAH – The name of a station or halting-place of the Israelites in the wilderness (Ex. xv. 23; Num. xxxiii. 8), so called in reference to the water of the well found there. It was reached by the Israelites three days after crossing the...
MANSION HOUSE AND GUILDHALL MEETINGS – Meetings held at the summons of the lord mayor of London by citizens of the English metropolis to protest against the persecution of the Jews. The first of these was held on July 3, 1840, to protest against the blood accusation...
MANTLE OF THE LAW – The cover of the scroll of the Pentateuch. The Hebrew name "mappah" is derived from the Greek μάππα. Originally, a wrapping of fine silk was spread along the full length of the parchment, to protect the writing from dust and...