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The unedited full-text of the 1906 Jewish Encyclopedia
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S. Janovsky,

Counselor at Law, St. Petersburg, Russia.

Contributions:
CHENSTOCHOV – City in the government of Petrokow, Russian Poland, the Jewish inhabitants of which in 1897 numbered 12,500 in a total population of 45,130. Most of the Jews are merchants, only 2,155 being artisans. Of the latter, 801 are...
CHEREI – A small town in the government of Mohilev, Russia, with (1898) about 3,000 inhabitants, of whom 1,300 are Jews. The principal occupations of the latter are commerce and handicrafts. The total number of artisans is 298, 189 being...
CHERIKOV – Town in the government of Mohilev, Russia. According to the last census (1897) it has 5,250 inhabitants, including 2,700 Jews. Most of the latter are small tradesmen; 12 are engaged in horticulture, and 10 in gardening. In the...
CHERNEVTZY – Town in the government of Podolia, Russia; it has (1898) a population of about 15,000, including about 2,000 Jews. Of the latter, 267 are artisans, but most of them earn a livelihood as small tradesmen. In the local...
CHERNIGOV – A city in Russia; capital of the government of the same name. The Jewish settlement at Chernigov is one of the oldest of the Ukraine. In the thirteenth century a rabbi, Isaac (Itze) of Chernigov, is mentioned, who spoke the...
CHERNIGOV – A government of Little Russia (Ukraine), with a Jewish population (1897) of 114,630 in a total population of 2,298,834, or nearly 5 per cent. In 1881 the Jewish inhabitants formed only 2.5 per cent of the total. By districts,...
CHERNOBYL – Town in the government of Kiev, Russia; it has (1898) a population of 10,759, including 7,189 Jews. Of the latter, 651 are artisans, of whom 419 own shops 192 are wage-workers, and 40 are apprentices. The predominating trade is...
CHIGIRIN – Town in the government of Kiev, Russia, with a population (in 1897) of 9,870, including about 3,000 Jews. The latter are engaged principally in commerce and the handicrafts, the total number of artisans being 551. Tailoring is...
CHUDNOV – Town in the government of Volhynia, Russia. A Jewish community existed here before the uprising of the Cossacks in 1648. In 1898 the town had nearly 8,000 inhabitants. Among them there were about 3,500 Jews, who were principally...
DASHEV – Village in the government of Kiev, Russia. It has a population of 6,200, including 3,200 Jews, whose sources of income are mainly commercial and industrial. About 714 are artisans, 278 of these being masters. Tailoring occupies...
DAVID-GORODOK – Town in the government of Minsk, Russia. In 1895 it had a population of 10,086, including 4,902 Jews. The latter are mostly engaged in business and in industrial vocations. There are 672 artisans, 564 of whom conduct their own...
DERAZHNYA – Village in the government of Podolia, Russia. In 1898 it had a population of 6,118, of which 5,230 were Jews. Handicrafts constitute the most important sources of income, 518 persons being occupied by them. About 25 families are...
DERECHIN – Town in the government of Grodno, Russia. According to the census of 1897 it has a population of 2,289, of whom 1,573 are Jews. The main sources of income are in trade and handicrafts. There are 227 artisans. Shoemaking is the...
DEVENISHKI – Village in the government of Wilna, Russia. The census of 1898 shows a population of 1,877, of whom 1,283 are Jews. Of the latter 277 are artisans. About 66 Jewish women and girls earn a livelihood by knitting stockings, which...
DISNA – Town in the government of Wilna, Russia. According to the census of 1897, it has a population of 6,739, about 5,600 being Jews. Most of these are traders. About 265 persons are employed as day-laborers. Truck-farming gives...
DOKSHITZY – Town in the government of Minsk, Russia. The census of 1897 shows a population of 3,647 (other authorities place it at 5,720), of whom more than 3,000 are Jews; in 1860, according to Semenov, "Slovar Rossiskoi Imperii," there...
DOMBROVITZA – Town in the government of Volhynia, Russia. It has a total population of about 25,000, including 6,000 Jews, about 1,000 of whom are artisans. The most general occupations are tailoring and shoemaking, each employing about 195...
DRISSA – Russian city in the government of Vitebsk. The population in 1897 was 4,237, of whom 2,856 were Jews. There were 657 artisans (including 229 masters) and 158 day-laborers. Among its charitable institutions may be noted the...
DUBNO – Town in the government of Volhynia, Russia. According to the census of 1897 it had a population of 13,785, including 5,608 Jews. The chief sources of income for the latter are in trading and industrial occupations. There are 902...
DUBOSARY – Village in the government of Kherson, Russia. In 1897 it had a population of 13,276, of whom about 5,000 were Jews. A considerable number of the latter are engaged in tobacco growing, while many others are occupied in...
DUBROVNA – Village situated on both banks of the Dnieper river, in the government of Mohilev, in northwestern Russia. Its total population in 1898 was 8,687. Of this number 4,559 were Jews. Dubrovna is known as the first and almost the...
DUNAYEVTZY – Village in the government of Podolia, Russia. It had a population (1898) of 13,000, of whom 7,000 were Jews. The chief sources of income for the Jews are from trade and industrial occupations. The most important articles of...
DVINSK – City in the government of Vitebsk, Russia. It is situated on the River Düna, at the intersection of two railroads. It was founded in 1278 by the Knights of the Livonian Order, and in 1561 was annexed to Poland. According to the...
DYVIN – Village in the government of Grodno, Russia. It has a very old Jewish community, but it is impossible to determine when Jews first settled there. When the town endeavored to secure the Magdeburg Law, the Jews contributed for the...
GÜNZBURG, DAVID, BARON – Russian Orientalist and communal leader; born at Kamenetzetz-Podolsk July 5, 1857. He was educated at home, his teachers being Adolph Neubauer, Senior Sachs, and Hirsch Rabinovich. At the age of twenty he received the degree of...