JewishEncyclopedia.com

The unedited full-text of the 1906 Jewish Encyclopedia
- Phrase search: "names of god"
- Exclude terms: "names of god" -zerah
- Volume/Page: v9 p419
- Diacritics optional: Ḥanukkah or hanukkah
- Search by Author: altruism author:Hirsch
search tips & recommendations

M. Seligsohn,

Diplomé of the Ecole des Hautes Etudes, Paris, France; now New York City.

Contributions:
ḤARITH IBN 'AMR – Yemenite king who embraced Judaism; born about 260; ascended the throne about 320; died about 330. Nothing is known of this king's history, as he is mentioned only by Abu al-Fida ("Historia Anteislamica," ed. Fleischer, p. 118),...
ḤASDAI, ABU OMAR JOSEPH IBN – Judæo-Spanish poet of the eleventh century; probably born at Cordova; died between 1045 and 1055. Ibn Janaḥ, in his "Luma'" (p. 152="Riḳmah," p. 86; between 1050 and 1055), speaks of Joseph as already dead. He saw him at...
HASHABIAH – Name of several Levites, chiefly in the time of the return from Babylon. The most important are: 1. The fourth son of Jeduthun, appointed by David to play the harp under the direction of his father in the house of the Lord; he...
HA-SHAḤAR – Hebrew monthly; published at Vienna from 1869 to 1884 by P. Smolenskin, who was also its editor. It resembled the German "Monatsschrift," containing scientific articles, essays, biographies, and narratives. It contained also...
HASHUB – 1. Son of Pahath-moab, who assisted Nehemiah in the repair of the walls of Jerusalem (Neh. iii. 11). 2. Another Hashub, engaged in the same work (Neh. iii. 23). 3. One of the chiefs of the people, who sealed the covenant with...
HASHUM – 1. Chief of a family the members of which, two hundred and twenty-three in number, returned from captivity with Zerubbabel (Ezra ii. 19; comp. Neh. vii. 22). Seven of them had married foreign women, whom they had to put away...
HASSENAAH – The sons of Hassenaah rebuilt the fish-gate in the wall of Jerusalem (Neh. iii. 3). The name occurs twice (Ezra ii. 35 and Neh. vii. 38) without the definite article, while in Neh. xi. 9 (R. V.) and I Chron. ix. 7 (R. V.) it...
HATTUSH – 1. Son of Shemaiah, a descendant of the kings of Judah, in the fifth generation from Zerubbabel (I Chron. iii. 22). He returned with Zerubbabel and Ezra from Babylon to Jerusalem (Ezra viii. 2; Neh. xii. 2), and was one of those...
HAUSEN, MOSES BEN ASHER ANSHEL – Danish Talmudic scholar: born at Copenhagen 1752; died June 28, 1782. He wrote a work entitled "Ḳaran Or Pene Mosheh," a homiletic commentary to Genesis (Hamburg, 1787). Zedner and Benjacob attribute the authorship of this work...
HAVOTH-JAIR – Certain villages or towns on the east of the Jordan in Bashan and in Gilead, named after their conquerors. 1. The towns of Jair, son of Manasseh, which occupied the whole tract of Argob in Bashan (Num. xxxii. 41; Deut. iii. 14)....
ḤAYYIM ABRAHAM BEN ARYEH LÖB – Russian preacher; lived at Moghilef in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. He wrote: "Milḥamah be-Shalom," the history of Joseph and his brethren, Sklow, 1795 (see Drama, Hebrew); "Pat Leḥem," a commentary on Baḥya's "Ḥobot...
ḤAYYIM, ABRAHAM BEN JUDAH IBN – Spanish scholar and scribe of the thirteenth century. He wrote a Spanish treatise on the preparation of gold-foil and colors for miniatures; also a treatise, probably in Hebrew, on the Masorah and on the crowned letters in the...
ḤAYYIM OF FALAISE (ḤAYYIM PALTIEL?) – French Biblical commentator of the thirteenth century; grandson of the tosafist Samuel of Falaise (Sir Morel). An anonymous commentator on the Pentateuch (Munich MS. No. 62) frequently quotes another commentary ( ) on the...
ḤAYYIM BEN ISAAC REIZES – Head of the yeshibah at Lemberg; born 1687; martyred May 13, 1728. Ḥayyim and his brother Joshua were thrown into prison on the eve of Passover, March 24, 1728, as the result of being falsely denounced by a Jewish convert, who...
ḤAYYIM JACOB BEN JACOB DAVID – Rabbi of Smyrna; lived in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. According to Michael, he was born at Smyrna and was a pupil of Ḥayyim b. Jacob Abulafia, author of "'Eẓ Ḥayyim." He went to Safed, the rabbis of which town sent...
ḤAYYIM JACOB BEN JUDAH LÖB SLUTZKI – Russian rabbinical scholar; lived in the first half of the nineteenth century. He was the author of "Niṭe'e Na'amanim," containing the Midrash Konen with a double commentary—"Ẓerof ha-Kesef," explanatory of the text and giving...
ḤAYYIM MAL'AK – Polish Shabbethaian agitator; lived in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. According to Jacob Emden ("Torat ha-Ḳena'ot," p. 55), Ḥayyim was at first named "Mehallek" (the wanderer), because he traveled to Turkey to learn...
ḤAYYIM BEN MENAHEM OF GLOGAU – German scholar; lived in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. He wrote a work entitled "Mar'eh ha-Ketab bi-Leshon Ashkenaz we-Rashe Tebot" (Berlin, about 1717), a manual, chiefly for the use of women, on reading and writing...
ḤAYYIM BEN NATHAN – German scholar of the seventeenth century. He translated into Judæo-German the historical portions of the Bible. In the preface to his translation he says that he derived his version from the "Galchisch" Bible (Bible of the...
ḤAYYIM SHABBETHAI – Rabbi of Salonica; born about 1556; died 1647. After studying in the yeshibah of Salonica under Aaron Sason, Ḥayyim became a member of the bet din presided over by the latter. In 1607 he succeeded his former master as head of...
ḤAYYIM BEN SOLOMON OF MOGHILEF – Rabbi and cabalist; died at Jerusalem in 1813. He was one of the Ḥasidic followers of Israel Ba'al Shem, and after he had been rabbi at five different towns, among them Moghilef and Czernowitz, he settled in Jerusalem.Ḥayyim was...
ḤAYYIM BEN ZEBULON JACOB PERLMUTTER – Rabbi of Ostropol, Russia, in the eighteenth century. He was the author of "Elef Omer," a collection of sayings beginning with "aleph," and based on the "Beḥinat 'Olam" of Jedaiah Bedersi (Grodno, 1795), and "Shirah le-Ḥayyim,"...
ḤAYYUN, AARON BEN DAVID – Cabalist; lived at Jerusalem in the seventeenth century. He, together with David Yiẓḥaḳi and Jacob Molko, was dayyan in the rabbinate of Moses Galante. A decision by Ḥayyun concerning the dispute between Mordecai ha-Levi, chief...
HA-ẒEFIRAH – Hebrew newspaper; founded by Ḥayyim Selig Slonimski at Warsaw Jan. 25, 1862. In 1863 it was suspended on account of the Polish troubles. Slonimski revived it in 1874, the first two volumes appearing at Berlin, the third and...
HAZEROTH – A station of the Israelites in the desert (Num. xi. 35, xii. 16, xxxiii. 17; Deut. i. 1). It was at Hazeroth that Miriam, having slandered her brother Moses, was stricken with leprosy (Num. xii. 1-11). The geographical position...