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The unedited full-text of the 1906 Jewish Encyclopedia
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MANOAH OF LUNEL – See Manoah b. Jacob.
MANOAH B. SHEMARIAH HANDEL – Polish author; born at Brzeszticzka ( ), Volhynia; died in 1612. He was the author of the following works: "Ḥokmat Manoaḥ," glosses to the Talmud (printed in the Cracow 1602-5 edition of the Talmud, and separately at Prague, in...
MANRESA – Town in Spain, in the province of Barcelona. In the twelfth century it is said to have contained 500 Jewish families, most of which lived in a narrow lane named "Grau dels Jueus," near the town hall; their cemetery, still called...
MANSION HOUSE AND GUILDHALL MEETINGS – Meetings held at the summons of the lord mayor of London by citizens of the English metropolis to protest against the persecution of the Jews. The first of these was held on July 3, 1840, to protest against the blood accusation...
MANṢUR MARZUḲ – Egyptian rabbi and author; settled at Salonica toward the close of the eighteenth century. He was the author of several works: "Ẓur Todah" (Salonica, 1783), a commentary on the Yad ha-Ḥazaḳah; "Ben Pedahẓur" (ib. 1786), sermons;...
MANTINO, JACOB BEN SAMUEL – Italian physician; died at Damascus in 1549. His parents—and perhaps Mantino himself—were natives of Tortosa, Spain, which place they left at the time of the banishment of the Jews from Spain (1492). Mantino studied medicine and...
MANTLE OF THE LAW – The cover of the scroll of the Pentateuch. The Hebrew name "mappah" is derived from the Greek μάππα. Originally, a wrapping of fine silk was spread along the full length of the parchment, to protect the writing from dust and...
MANTUA – Under the Gonzagas. Fortified Italian city, on the Mincio; capital of the duchy of Mantua. It has a population of 29,160, including 1,100 Jews (1901). In 1858 it had 2,523 Jews—the greatest number in its history. The first...
MANUEL, EUGÈNE – French educator and poet; born at Paris July 13, 1823; died there June 1, 1901. A grandson on his mother's side of the famous Paris ḥazzan Lovy, he remained throughout his brilliant career intimately attached to the faith of his...
MANUSCRIPTS – Writing Material. The first materials used for writing were such substances as stone, wood, and metal, upon which the characters were engraved with a stylus. At a very early time, however, animal substances were employed, and...
MA'OZ ẒUR – Commencement of the hymn originally sung only in the domestic circle, but now used also in the synagogue, after the kindling of the lights on the Feast of Dedication (Ḥanukkah). The acrostic signature is that of Mordecai. Zunz...
MAPU, ABRAHAM – Russian Hebrew novelist; born near Kovno Jan. 10, 1808; died at Königsberg Oct. 9, 1867. Mapu introduced the novel into Hebrew literature. His early education in Bible and Talmud was received at the ḥeder, on leaving which, at...
MAR – Aramaic noun meaning "lord." Daniel addresses the king as "Mari" (= "my lord"; Dan. iv. 16 [A. V. 19]; comp. Hebr. "Adoni," used in speaking to the king). In the Palestinian schools "Mari" and "Rabbi" were customarily employed...
MARAH – The name of a station or halting-place of the Israelites in the wilderness (Ex. xv. 23; Num. xxxiii. 8), so called in reference to the water of the well found there. It was reached by the Israelites three days after crossing the...
MARANO – Crypto-Jews of the Iberian Peninsula. The term, which is frequently derived from the New Testament phrase "maran atha" ("our Lord hath come"), denotes in Spanish "damned," "accursed," "banned"; also "hog," and in Portuguese it...
MARBE HASKALAH – See Society for the Promotion of Culture Among the Jews of Russia.
MARBLE – A stone composed mainly of calcium carbonate or of calcium and magnesium carbonates. It is mentioned in the Old Testament in three very late passages only. According to I Chron. xxix. 2, David prepared, among other materials,...
MARBURG – 1. Town in the Prussian province of Hesse-Nassau. Jews are first mentioned as living in Marburg in a document dated May 13, 1317, which indicates that they were then organized as a community and possessed a synagogue; also that...
MARC, CHARLES CHRETIEN HENRI – French physician; born in Amsterdam Nov. 4, 1771, died in Paris Jan. 12, 1841. He took the degree of M.D. at Erlangen in 1792, and practised at Vienna, Bamberg, and in Bohemia. In 1795 he went to Paris, where with Fourcroy,...
MARC-MOSSÉ, JOSEPH – French poet and author; born in Carpentras about 1780; died in Paris Feb. 21, 1825. His name appears to have been originally "Moses"; he was known also under the pseudonyms "L'Ami" and "Lejoyeux de Saint Acre." At the age of six...
MARCELLO, BENEDETTO – Italian musician; born at Venice 1686; died there 1739. He is particularly celebrated for his settings to the Psalms, fifty of which, under the title of "Estro Poetico-Armonico, Parafrasi Sopra li Salmi," were published at...
MARCUS AURELIUS ANTONINUS – See Antoninus.
MARCUS, BRENTGEN – First Jewish court singer in Germany; flourished toward the end of the seventeenth century. She lived with her father, Isaac Marcus, in the town of Wesel in Brandenburg, where, in 1690, Frederick of Brandenburg, afterward King...
MARCUS, LEWI (LEWIN) – German lawyer; born Oct. 15, 1809, at Rhena, Mecklenburg; died Oct. 7, 1881, at Manchester, England. On account of his indefatigable exertions in behalf of his coreligionists he became known as the "Gabriel Riesser of...
MARCUS, LOUIS – See Markus, Ludwig.