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LANDESRABBINERSCHULE IN BUDAPEST (Országos Rabbiképzö Intézet):

Table of Contents

The efforts to found a rabbinical seminary in Hungary reach back to the beginning of the nineteenth century. The various projects, however, did not receive tangible form until a Jewish school fund had been created by King Francis Joseph in 1850 (see Jew. Encyc. vi. 502, s.v. Hungary). The government made an attempt to open a rabbinical school in 1864, but on account of internal party quarrels the matter dragged on until 1873. After a building had been erected especially for its requirements the institute was opened Oct. 4, 1877.

Organization.

The institute is under the supervision of the ministry of religion, which appoints the teachers upon nomination by the council (consisting of twelve clerical and twelve lay members), of which M. Schweiger has been president and Dr. J. Simon secretary ever since the institute's foundation. The course of study extends over ten years and is divided into two equal periods; one being devoted to the lower department, the other to the upper. The former corresponds to an "Obergymnasium"; and the requirement for admission is the possession of a diploma from an "Untergymnasium," or the passing of an entrance examination covering the equivalent of the course of study pursued there as well as a certain amount of Hebrew and Talmudics. The diplomas from this department are recognized by the state, and command admittance into any department of the universities or schools of technology. After the completion of the courses offered by the upper department, including attendance under the faculty of philosophy at the university, a year of probation follows. This is concluded in February by an oral examination after the candidate has presented three written theses on Biblical, rabbinic-Talmudical, and historical or religious-philosophical subjects respectively. At graduation he receives a rabbinical diploma, which is recognized by the state. To supplement the regular course of training there are students' societies in both departments.

The constitution of the institute has also the training of religious teachers in view; and a plan of study and examinations has been arranged to this end. The library of the institute contains about 25,000 volumes of manuscripts and printed works, which are accessible to all in the reading-room and may under certain conditions be taken from the library. The assistance of pupils is provided for by the Ez-Chajim Society, which at present has a fund amounting to 150,000 kronen and a yearly expenditure of 11,000 kronen. In addition there are various stipends which are not controlled by the society.

Faculty.

Since its foundation the institute has had eighteen teachers. The present professors in the department of theology are: Dr. W. Bacher (Bible and Midrash); M. Bloch (Talmud and Shulḥan 'Aruk); Dr. L. Blau (history, Bible, and Talmud; also librarian); Dr. I. Goldziher (philosophy of religion); and Dr. S. Kohn (homiletics). Among former teachers have been: "Rabbinatspräses" S. L. Brill (until 1887; d. 1893); D. Kaufmann (d. 1899; also librarian); and H. Deutsch (until 1888; d. 1889).The professors of the gymnasium courses are: A. Balogh (since 1892); K. Bein (since 1878); Dr. H. Bloch (since 1881); S. Schill (since 1878); director, Dr. I. Bánóczi (1877-1892). The singing-master is Chief Cantor A. Lazarus.

Bibliography:
  • I. Bánóczi, Gesch. des Ersten Jahrzehnts der Landes-Rabbinerschule (Supplement to the Annual Report for 1887-88);
  • L. Blau, Brill Sámuel Löw, pp. 27-32, Budapest, 1902;
  • S. Schill, A Budapesti Országos Rabbiképzöintézet Története, Budapest, 1896;
  • Annual Reports (with literary supplements).
D. L. B.
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