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The unedited full-text of the 1906 Jewish Encyclopedia
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BRÜX – Town of Bohemia, 14 miles north of Saaz. Documents prove that, as early as the fourteenth century, Jews were living at Brüx. In 1393 Borso the Younger, of Riesenburg and Petschau, gave his note for fifty schock of Prague...
BRYANSK – Town in the government of Grodno, Russia, with a Jewish population (1898) of 2,365, in a total population of 6,342. Of the Jews 525 are artisans and 85 gardeners and farmers.H. R. S. J.
BUBER, SOLOMON – Galician scholar and editor of Hebrew works; born at Lemberg Feb. 2, 1827. His father, Isaiah Abraham Buber, was versed in Talmudic literature and Jewish philosophy, and was Solomon's teacher in the latter subject; but for his...
BUCHHEIM, CHARLES ADOLPHUS – Professor of the German language and German literature at King's College, London; born in Moravia1828; died at London June 4, 1900. He was educated at the University of Vienna, whence he received the degree of Ph.D.; settled in...
BUCHAREST – Ancient capital of Wallachia, and the present capital of Rumania. The oldest Jewish tombstone is dated 1682; but Jews settled in the city much earlier. In 1573 a Jew, Isaiah b. Joseph, was secretary to Prince Alexander Mircea....
BUCHBINDER, BERNHARD – Austrian journalist; born July 6, 1854, in Budapest, where he received his education, being destined for a mercantile career. A one-act comedy, which he wrote after he left school, and which was played successfully in Budapest,...
BUCHHOLZ, CARL AUGUST – German Christian lawyer and author; born in the latter half of the eighteenth century; died at Lübeck Nov. 15, 1843. He was a doctor of laws and of philosophy, and, at the time of his death, occupied the position of second...
BUCHHOLZ, P. – German rabbi; born Oct. 2, 1837; died in Emden, Hanover, Sept. 20, 1892. He became rabbi of Märkisch-Friedland in 1863, where he remained till 1867, in which year he was called to the rabbinate of Stargard, Pomerania. In 1875 he...
BÜCHLER, ADOLF – Austrian historian and theologian; born Oct. 18, 1867, at Priekopa, Hungary. In 1887 he began his theological studies at the Budapest Seminary, and at the same time studied in the department of philosophy of the university under...
BÜCHLER, ALEXANDER – Born in Fülek, Hungary, in 1869; son of the Talmudist rabbi Phineas Büchler of Moór. He was educated at the gymnasium in Székesfehérvár and at the university and the seminary of Budapest; he received the degree of Ph.D. in 1893,...
BUCHNER, WOLF B. DAVID HAKOHEN – Hebrew stylist; born at Brody in the latter half of the eighteenth century and lived into the nineteenth. In his boyhood Buchner enjoyed the hospitality which every Talmud student found in those days in the bet ha-midrash, and...
BUCHSBAUM – Family of Jewish physicians of Frankfort-on-the-Main, whose activity extended over a century. Its prominent members were:1. Amschel Gutman Buchsbaum: Son of Gutman Wolf (No. 3). He graduated from the University of Giessen in...
BUCKLER – See Shield.
BUCURESTEANU (BUCURESHTEANU), ABRAHAM COHEN – Rumanian publicist; born at Bucharest 1840; died there Jan. 24, 1877. From his earliest youth he was passionately fond of the theater, and obtained some success on the stage; but by the advice of his family he devoted himself to...
BUCZACZ, ABRAHAM DAVID B. ASHER ANSHEL – Galician Talmudist; born 1770 at Nadworna; died 1840 at Buczacz. Even as a boy he attracted, by his acuteness in Talmudic knowledge, the attention of the leading Talmudists to such a degree that Ẓebi Hirsch, the author of "Neṭa'...
BUDA – See Budapest.
BUDA, PURIM OF – In 1684 the Christian armies laid siege to Buda (Ofen) to drive out the Turks, who had held possession of the city from 1541; their design was, however, frustrated by the stout resistance of the Turks and Jews. The participation...
BUDAPEST – The capital of Hungary. Of the several congregations within this tripartite city, Buda (Ofen), Ó-Buda (Alt-Ofen), and Pesth, that at Buda is the oldest (see Alt-Ofen); Jewish population in 1900 was 166,198. The first mention of...
BUDEK – Polish Catholic priest; canon of Wislica at the beginning of the fifteenth century, and one of the most vigorous Jew-baiters of his time. It was he who instigated the attack on the Jews of Cracow on the third day of Easter...
BÜDINGER, MAX – Austrian historian; born April 1, 1828, at Cassel, Germany; died at Vienna Feb. 23, 1902; son of Moses Mordecai Büdinger.Büdinger devoted himself from 1847 to 1851 to the study of history at the universities of Marburg, Bonn,...
BÜDINGER, MOSES ISRAEL BEN ISAAC – Teacher at Metz at the end of the eighteenth century and the beginning of the nineteenth. He devoted himself to Hebrew grammar and literature and trained a large number of grammarians and writers of elegant Hebrew. Büdinger was...
BÜDINGER, MOSES MORDECAI – German educator; born at Maidorf, a village in Hessen, Jan., 1783; died at Cassel Jan. 31, 1841. At the age of twenty he became a servant in the house of a petty Jewish merchant, and later, by dint of indefatigable zeal, became...
BUDNY, SIMON – Calvinist priest of Lithuania in the sixteenth century; founder of the Polish sect of the Budnians, who were surnamed "Half-Jews" ("Semi-Judaizantes"). He studied at the Academy of Cracow, where he became acquainted with some of...
BUDUSHCHNOST – Russo-Jewish weekly, established (1900) and edited by S. O. Gruzenberg. Like the "Voskhod," it gives valuableinformation concerning the history of the Jews and their social life and institutions; but while the former periodical...
BUDWEIS – City of Bohemia. Jews were settled there in the first half of the fourteenth century, possibly earlier. In 1337 the community was destroyed by the Flagellants. In 1341 King John I. of Bohemia again admitted two Jews, who were...